Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #16

As we rambled through the Christmas Market on a tour of Budapest with Viking River Cruises, we smelled delicious aromas and one of the items was Chimney Cakes, a kind of twisted Cinnamon Roll or curled donut, with various flavors added. The Hungarian name is Kurtoskalacs. They are made from a sweet, yeast dough of which a strip is spun around a truncated coned-shaped baking spit.

 

The dough is rolled in sugar and roasted over a charcoal fire as illustrated in the photo. They are basted with melted butter while the spit is turned and cooked until the cakes turn a golden brown. During the cooking or roasting process the sugar turns to caramel and forms a shiny crust. The glaze is then topped with additional toppings like ground walnuts and cinnamon.

 

Chimney Cakes Budapest

 

The origin of the name Chimney Cake refers to a stovepipe, since the fresh, steaming cake in the shape of a truncated cone, resembles a hot chimney. The first recorded mention was in about 1450 and is found in a manuscript by Heidelberg. It was described as a strip wound in a helix shape around a baking spit and brushed with egg yolk before baking. In the 16th century there were three varieties of this pastry with minimal variances in components and shape.

 

The Hungarian and Czech pastry were approximately the same and were described in the original cake above. The second type is a pastry made from batter belonging to the Lithuanian, Polish, French German, Austrian and Swedish populations.The third and final style was a continuous dough strip placed on a spit. In 1876 Aunt Rezi’s Cookbook was the first recipe that applies sprinkling sugar on kürtőskalács before baking to achieve a caramelized sugar glaze.

 

The present day baked item emerged in the first half of the 20th century. This included the use of ground, chopped or candied walnuts applied as an additional topping. As far as we know Pal Kovi’s cookbook Erdélyi lakoma (Transylvanian Feast), came out in 1980 and appears to be the first mention of applying this type of topping. At the end of the century a far reaching range of flavoring, cinnamon, coconut, cocoa, vanilla, etc. were toppings applied in addition to the nuts. The cakes have remained fairly stable since this. I can tell you, it is critical you buy one if given the chance. They are delicious and worth every penny!

 

 

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #15

We chose the three day extension in Prague on our cruise with Viking River Cruises and I can’t say we were disappointed. I fell head over hills with this charming eastern European city. The architecture is outstanding and beyond magnificent. The food although probably not the healthiest is very traditional and so tasty, including sausages, plenty of ghoulash and great cuts of meat, including fabulous lamb.

 

A friend of mine is currently staying at the Corinthia Hotel with Viking River Cruises, as I write this post. It flooded my brain with memories. Thank you Marilyn Jones of Traveling with Marilyn for reminding me of our Danube Waltz cruise. It was definitely a trip of a lifetime. As you just told me on Facebook (sorry, I had to throw that in) we both love Viking so much! Of course with their consistent 5-star service they make it easy.

 

Prague Taxi 2

 

One of the things I recognized right away was these antique replica cars that serve as Taxis in Prague. Regardless of the temperature people were delighted to jump in and cruise the city. I was flabbergasted that in the biting cold people were actually standing in line to ride in these taxis. They are facsimiles of vintage vehicles.

 

 

Prague Taxi 3

 

You can also hire a vintage touring Praga car with driver from the Prague Tours by Vintage Cars company. These vehicles used to belong to the upper-middle class in the years 1928–35. The autos have been well maintained and you receive a history lesson during the ride.

  • Tours Start: You can decide the meeting point and the time
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Models:
    • Praga Alfa, 1929 (3–4 persons)
    • Praha SAM, 2013 – copy of Praga Alfa (3–4 persons)
    • Praga AN 10, 1928 (8 persons with possibility to add two more seats)

 

Prague Taxi 4

 

Sadly I have to mention that the some of the taxi drivers in Prague are notorious for overcharging tourists. Tactics sketchy drivers use include quoting overly high prices, take long, scenic routes, use faulty meters, and demand higher fares than agreed upon at the end of the ride. If you get scammed by a deceitful driver, it’s safest to pay the cost and choose a reputable taxi company for your next ride. Occasionally, scam taxi drivers have been known to assault passengers who won’t pay their prices. Try and ensure you have an established rate or if you really need a taxi to get somewhere in the city it’s better to call one of the reputable companies.

 

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

 

 

 

 

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #14

On our first day in Budapest with Viking River Cruises, we were able to break free and shop on our own for a few hours. We found several items of note. The first and foremost retail philosophy was that all shopkeepers in Hungary have to deal in authentic merchandise, actually made in Hungary, contrary to other countries. In a great deal of places just when you think it was made in the city or country you are in, you turn it over and there is that huge sticker indicating it was made in China, Pakistan or who knows where. I have to admit it was refreshing.

 

There is a strict motivation to only display and sell authentic merchandise. If the authorities discover you are trying to pass items as “Made in Hungary” and they are actually from somewhere else the shopkeeper could lose their license and have to close their shop. That’s quite an incentative to not misrepresent products. I questioned an embroidery blouse and Kim assured me it was handmade by the seams and stitching. She sews and has for a long time so I am sure she was correct. One of the shops had several snack items and this 4 foot display of Paprika.

 

Hungarian Paprika Budapest

 

Paprika is a ground spice made from red air-dried fruits of the larger and sweeter varieties of the plant Capsicum annuum, called bell pepper or sweet pepper, sometimes with the addition of more aromatic or fiery types, namely Chili and Cayenne peppers. Although paprika is often linked to Hungarian foods, it originated in central Mexico and was brought to Spain in the 16th century. It came to Hungary under the Ottoman rule, but didn’t become popular in Hungary until the 19th century. Paprika can range in flavor from extremely hot to almost bland in taste.

 

Sweet paprika, the more common spice has more than half the seeds removed and hot paprika has seeds, stalks, sheath and husks all ground together. The Hungarian plant was brought by the Turks to Buda, now half Budapest the Capitol of Hungary, in 1529. The Central European paprika was hot until the 1920’s when a German breeder discovered a sweet fruit which he grafted to the other plants and developed the current paprika.

Hungary is a primary source for of common paprika these days but comes in various grades:

 

  • Noble sweet paprika – slightly pungent, bright red color, most commonly exported paprika
  • Special quality paprika – the mildest, a very deep bright red color
  • Delicate paprika  – a mild paprika with a rich flavor, light red to dark red
  • Exquisite delicate paprika  – similar to “Delicate”, but more pungent
  • Pungent exquisite delicate paprika  – an even more pungent version of delicate
  • Rose paprika – with a strong aroma and mild pungency, pale red color
  • Half-sweet paprika – a blend of mild and pungent paprikas; medium pungency
  • Strong paprika – the hottest paprika, light brown color

 

Who knew their were so many types of paprika or that there was such a history and assortment of colors and flavors!

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #13

One of the most memorable places visited on our Viking River Cruise was the Melk Abbey in Melk Austria. It was a rainy and miserable day and wasn’t pleasant until we entered the abbey. As we toured the Cathedral shown below it became quite obvious that this was a special tour and one that I would remember forever. The frescoes and the Monastery’s Church with the pulpit shown in my photo, was gorgeous in my mind. You see a great deal of churches across Europe, but I would have to say that the Melk Abbey has some of the most captivating and interesting art that I have seen. In addition if you like to read and are interested in books, especially rare publications Melk has a treasure trove.

 

The library was established in the twelfth century and contains 1,888 manuscripts, 750 books printed before 1500 (called incunabula), 1700 works from the sixteenth century, 4500 from the seventeenth century, 18,000 from the eighteenth century, with a total of around 100,000 volumes with the newer books are included. About 16,000 books are located in the main library room, which has the fresco by Paul Troger (1731/32) on the ceiling.

 

Melk Abbey

 

Melk Abbey is a Benedictine abbey above the town of Melk, Austria overlooking the Danube river and next to the Wachau valley. Several remains were placed in the abbey including Saint Coloman of Stockerau and members of the House of Babenberg, Austria’s first ruling dynasty. The abbey was founded in 1089, that means it’s over one thousand years old! The frescoes in the church were done by Johann Michael Rottmayr. I could have spent days and days viewing the original manuscripts housed in this aged repository. As it was rainy and freezing outside the regulated temperatures inside the abbey felt ideal.

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #12

During our Viking River Cruise we stopped in Bratislava, Slovakia. In the center of the city, near the Christmas Markets was this amazing building with wonderful architecture and ornate trim. It was the Slovakia National Theater and is the oldest professional theater in Slovakia, built in 1885-1886 during the time of Austria-Hungary. It was a Neo-Renaissance building based on a design by Viennese architects Fellner & Helmer, who designed theater buildings in 10 European countries. Its first performance was the opera “Bank ban” by Ferenc Erkel and is one of the most important Hungarian operas.

 

It is one of the most influential institutions in Slovakia and handles Opera, Drama and Ballet all in various productions. The historic building is located on Hviezdoslavovo Square. At the beginning of the new century the Brno Opera presented a wide cross-section through the Czech classical opera and, for the first time in Bratislava, Tchaikovski’s ’Eugen Onegin’ and ’The Queen of Spades’. In 1919 Bratislava became a part of the Czechoslovak Republic. In 1920 the professional Slovak National Theatre starts to work in the building of the City Theater. It has theater and opera companies. It starts its activities with the premiere of Smetana’s ’The Kiss’ on March 1, 1920.

 

Slovak National Theater in Bratislava

 

In the late 1800’s Bruno Walter gained experience here as a teacher. Born in Berlin he left Berlin in 1933 settling in the United States in 1939 and he became one of the great conductors of the 20th century with experience and holding major positions in the New York Philharmonic, Salzburg Festival, Vienna State Opera, Bavarian State Opera and the Deutsche Opera Berlin.

 

On 1 May 1979 a countrywide public anonymous competition was announced. On 25 February 1980 the 1st prize was given to the design by architects Peter Bauer, Martin Kusý and Pavol Paňák. Construction work started in 1986, although it ran into a multitude of delays owing to Government financial problems. An idea for the government to sell the building was overturned and the building was finally finished in 2008. The interior architects were Eduard Sutek and Alexandra Kusa. The structure holds 1700 seats on three different levels. Bratislava native sculptor Viktor Oskar Tilgner crafted the famous Ganymede’s Fountain in 1888, now located immediately in front of the theater, shown partially in my photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #11

We had an early start from the ship and after a fairly long bus ride, we arrived in Salzburg and started our walking tour through this fabulous historic city. Along the way we encountered the Bristol Hotel. There are approximately 200 hotels around the world with the name Bristol. Some are extravagantly decorated and some are average. The hotel first associated with Bristol name was the Place Vendome in Paris. It closed and a Hotel Le Bristol Paris opened in close proximity to the original. It’s currently located near Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore’ and is one of Paris’ 5-star hotels.

 

The Hotel Bristol in Salzburg was constructed originally in 1619 with Archbishop Paris Lodron planting the first block of it’s foundation. After it was completed it served as the residence of many noble families. Over the centuries it was redone by several individuals until it attained it’s present design in the 19th century. In the 1890’s the hotel was taken over by the city of Salzburg and was supplied with electricity. The hotel became known as the “Electric Hotel” and helped supply electricity to a portion of Old Quarter.

 

 

Bristol Hotel, Salzburg Austria

 

Over the years many movie stars, government officials and illustrious men and women have stayed at this hotel. Approximately 74 years ago the Hubner family assumed custody of the hotel and it is run by their third generation today. One of a very few privately held hotels in Salzburg under their exclusive management.

 

Most people are reminded of the movie “The Sound of Music”, a story about the Von Trapp Austrian family when they hear Salzburg. It was filmed in distinct locations around the city including the Mirabell Palace and Gardens and St. Peters Monastery, Cementary and Catacombs, along with the Leopoldskron Palace. The cast and ensemble all stayed at the Bristol Hotel during the filming in 1965, in Mozart’s home town!

 

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #10

Our last day on the Danube was in Passau Germany. It was a cool day and I was the only individual interested in this view. I went up to the top deck to explore and to see the various perspectives of Passau. It’s a quaint, beautiful little German city with beautiful architecture and is known as the three rivers city. The Danube, Inn and Ilz rivers all converge on this town located on the Austrian border.  It’s overlooked by the Veste Oberhaus, a 13th-century hilltop fortress housing a city museum and observation tower. It is also the home of St. Stephens Cathedral featuring onion-domed towers and an organ with 17,974 pipes. It’s a must see if you visit Passau.

 

Viking Longship Modi

 

All longships in the Viking River fleet have this wonderful deck on top of their ships. When the weather is nice one can sit on this deck and catch the sun rays. Viking also grows spices and other edible flowers, etcetera, if the weather allows, that they use in their meals. It is set up where one can walk around or jog if it’s not crowded to get a little exercise. I chose to use it to view the different locks we went through at times, even though most were after dark. The pilot cabin is constructed on a lift and can be lowered at certain bridges that require a lower passage. I would urge you to venture up to this deck as it can’t be more than 3 floors above your cabin. I love Viking River Cruises and you owe it to yourself to venture out on one of their river cruises.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #9

The first day in Budapest we had a tour that covered both sides of the Danube River with Buda being the hilly side. It has “Old Town” with Fisherman’s Bastion, Halászbástya, a terrace above the Danube constructed in a neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style. It is located near Matthias Church which is a gorgeous 14th century cathedral, named after King Matthias. The portals of the Bastion offer stunning views of Pest, including the Hungarian Parliament building. I would definitely advise taking a bus up the hill as it proves very challenging on foot.

 

 

In the middle of Fisherman’s Bastion is a large statue of Saint Istvan, who was the first King of Hungary from December 25, 1000 and was crowned with a crown sent by Pope Sylvester II. In his later years he staved off considerable attempts to gain his throne. Near the end of this period he conquered the armies of Conrad II, who was a Holy Roman Emperor in 1030. He preserved his kingdom during his reign that he established until 1038 when he passed away. His death caused civil wars that went on for many years, several decades in length. He was the first member of his family to become a devout Christian and sadly outlived all his children. I love Budapest and it is now one of my favorite cities in the world.

 

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #8

Our three day extension in Prague after our Viking River Cruise on the Danube River was terrific and we saw a beautiful municipality, which is now one of my favorite cities in the world. On our way to the John Lennon wall one day we came upon this magnificent architectural phenomenon. It really captured my sense of bygone days. There were all sorts of crafts, jewelry and art being sold along the bridge. The statues and sculptures were fantastic located all along the bridge. On our way back we ran into a music group playing some kind of music that made me grab Kim and start dancing to the glee of everyone on the bridge and the group of musicians. It seemed like the thing to do. I seriously think the crowd loved it and we received great applause. Well maybe it was only one or two that clapped.

 

The Charles Bridge is a historic structure that crosses the Vitava river in Prague, Czech Republic. Actual work began in 1357 during the reign of King Charles IV and was completed in the early 1600’s. Initially it was called the Stone Bridge or just the Prague Bridge. In the late 1800’s it became known as the Charles Bridge, I’m guessing after King Charles who was in power when the construction began. Until 1841 it was the only passage across the Vitava river and was the exclusive connection between Prague Castle and Old Town Prague. It significantly increased land transit between eastern and western Europe.

 

 

Old Town Bridge Tower

 

The bridge is 2037 feet long and 33 feet wide. It was defined as a Bow Bridge, as the architecture resembled a bow. In addition it was a mirror of the Stone Bridge in Regensburg Germany. There are three towers, one on the Old Town side entrance and two on the Prague Castle side. There are 30 statues which were built close to 1700 in a Baroque style. They are all replicas now and have all been replaced with fabrications of the originals. This tower is considered by many to be one of the most astounding samples of Gothic style construction in the world.

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day #7

 

I haven’t kept up with my Photo of the Day series lately and have had a few medical issues, a first grandson born, with a trip to Japan to see the little guy and I thought it was time to get back in the saddle so to say and start producing again. I love Viking River Cruises and can’t talk enough about this great company. Their service, staff, tour guides, on-board staff and food is without reproach IMHO! So without any further adieu here we go with another Viking Cruises, Photo of the Day.

 

Szechenyi Chain Bridge

 

The Szechenyi Chain Bridge is a suspension bridge that spans the Danube river in Budapest Hungary. It separates the the two cities of Budapest with Buda on the west side and Pest on the east side. It is one of the most photographed bridges to my knowledge in Europe and perhaps the world. It is located on the Buda side near Gresham Palace and on the Pest side near the Castle Hill Funicular that leads to Buda Castle.

 

It is constructed of cast wrought iron and stone. At a length of 1,230 feet, a width of 49 feet it remained in place until World War II. When the Germans retreated they blew it up on January 18, 1945. Only the towers remained. The bridge was rebuilt and reopened in 1949, one hundred years from it’s original opening.

 

The bridge is was designed by William Tierney Clark in 1839. It was a replica of sorts of Tierney’s earlier Marlow Bridge that spanned the River Thames in Marlow England. It was the first permanent bridge in the Hungarian Capital when it opened in 1849, directly following the Hungarian Revolution.

 

A few cool facts in regard to the bridge’s popularity. A Hungarian stunt pilot actually flew upside down under the bridge in 2001. The stunt has become a habit in the Red Bull Air Races of today. It is featured in the following movies, I Spy, Au Pair, Walking with the Enemy, and several other generic Spy movies. Katy Perry uses it in her music video “Firework”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

***Portions of our cruise were sponsored by Viking River Cruises. All opinions, as always, are those of my own.

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